Major in Art

Students majoring in art must complete forty-five hours, including

  • ART 110, 120, 122, 391, 392, 491, and 492;
  • ARTH 110 and 120;
  • eighteen hours chosen from ART 230, 240, 260, 262, 280, 310, or 336;
  • and six hours chosen from ARTH 210, 220, 221, 230, 240, 245, 310, 320, or 410

Major in Art with Art History Concentration

The major in art with an art history concentration requires a total of forty-two hours, including

  • ART 110, 120, 122;
  • ARTH 110, 120, and 450;
  • eighteen hours chosen from ARTH 210, 220, 221, 230, 240, 245, 258, 310, 320, 410, or 458;
  • three hours selected from ART 230, 240, 260, 262, 310, or 336;
  • three hours in PHIL 322 or another cognate course approved by the major advisor.

Minor in Art

The minor in art requires eighteen hours, including

  • ART 110, 120, 122;
  • nine additional hours of studio art elective credit chosen from ART 230, 240, 260, 310, or 336.

Note: The department reserves the right to retain at least one example of a student’s work for its permanent exhibitions, with student’s approval.

Minor in Art History

Students who minor in art history must complete eighteen hours, including

  • ARTH 110, 120;
  • twelve additional hours chosen from ARTH 210, 220, 221, 230, 240, 245, 258, 310, 320, 410, or 458.

CO = Co-requisite, POI = Permission of Instructor, PR = Prerequisite, RE = Recommended, XL = Cross-listed

ART

101 Art Appreciation (3)

An introduction to the arts of painting, sculpture, and architecture. As a general survey course, emphasis is placed both on the development of an informed art vocabulary and on the exercise of those perceptual and cognitive skills which enhance aesthetic experiences in the arts. (Lectures, slide presentations, field trips, and creative applications)

110 Studio Foundations: Drawing (3)

A foundation course that explores various approaches to a range of drawing problems from landscape and still-life to human anatomy, from rendering to nonobjective abstraction. A variety of wet and dry media is employed in a series of projects and exercises designed to enhance both eye-hand coordination and perceptual acuity. No previous drawing experience is required. A materials fee is assessed for this course, in addition to necessary art supplies purchased by individual students. (Studio applications and field trips)

120 Studio Foundations: 2-D (3)

A foundation course surveying the elements and principles of visual organization in two-dimensional art. Perceptual and conceptual skills are enhanced through a series of experimental studio projects focused on composition and color theory. No previous design experiences are required. A materials fee is assessed for this course, in addition to necessary art supplies purchased by individual students. (Lectures and studio applications; alternate years – fall or spring)

122 Studio Foundations: 3-D (3)

A foundations course surveying materials, concepts, and principles of visual structure/organization in the dimensional world. Through a series of problem-solving projects, readings, and class discussion, students will gain insight into the basic language of three-dimensional design. A materials fee is assessed for this course, in addition to necessary art supplies purchased by individual students. (Alternate years – fall or spring)

230 Painting I (3)

(PR: ART 110 and 120, or POI) An introduction to the theory and practice of painting in oils, stressing color and surface in response to direct visual observations. This course covers a range of materials and technical skills that are presented with frequent reference to the broader history of painting. A materials fee is assessed for this course, in addition to necessary art supplies purchased by individual students. (Demonstration, painting on location in the landscape, and studio application; alternate years – fall or spring)

240 Sculpture (3)

(PR: ART 110 and 120, or POI) A study of both additive and subtractive approaches to sculptural representation in the context of art history and executed in a variety of media such as clay, stone, plaster, metals, wood, and glass. A materials fee is assessed for this course, in addition to necessary art supplies purchased by individual students. (Demonstrations and studio applications; Alternate years – fall or spring)

260 Printmaking I (3)

(PR: ART 110 and 120, or POI) An introduction to the techniques of relief and intaglio printing processes such as woodcut, linocut, etching, aquatint, and dry point. A materials fee is assessed for this course, in addition to necessary art supplies purchased by individual students. (Demonstrations and studio applications; Alternate years – fall or spring)

262 Printmaking II: Screen Printing (2)

(PR: ART 110 and 120, or POI) An introduction to the techniques and processes of screen-printing with an emphasis on fine arts applications. A materials fee is assessed for this course, in addition to necessary art supplies purchased by individual students. (Demonstrations and studio applications, Alternate years – fall or spring)

An introduction to the techniques and processes of screen-printing with an emphasis on fine arts applications. A materials fee is assessed for this course, in addition to necessary art supplies purchased by individual students. (Demonstrations and studio applications, Alternate years – fall or spring)

274 Introduction to Digital Photography and Culture (3)

This course explores the ways in which digital images reflect and transform cultural notions of power, belief, and societal values. It also serves as a basic introduction to the technical and aesthetic use of a digital camera and image-editing software for expressive communication in print and online.

280 Art for the Child (3)

A study of the child’s creative growth in arts and crafts. Designed to help the classroom teacher develop the creative skills that enhance instruction in all content areas while facilitating a quality art program within the broader context of a general classroom environment. This class is limited to majors in early childhood education, Christian education, and art. Other students may contact the art department with a request to be enrolled on appeal. A materials fee is assessed for this course, in addition to necessary art supplies purchased by individual students. (Lectures and studio applications)

308 Graphics Programming and Animation (3)

(PR: CSC 1231-1231L • XL: CSC 308) This course introduces the student to programming that draws 2D or 3D images on the screen. In particular, we will study graphics packages that enable 105 interactive drawing and animation in 2D and 3D spaces. (Alternate years)

310 Life Drawing (3)

(PR: ART 110 and 120, or POI) An extensive study of artistic anatomy and the expressive potential of the human form. Drawing from the model and skeleton with a wide array of drawing and painting media. A materials fee is assessed for this course, in addition to necessary art supplies purchased by individual students. (Lecture/demonstrations and studio applications, Alternate years – fall or spring)

336 Painting II (3)

(PR: ART 230, 232 or 234) An exploration of the form/content relationship in the practice of painting in a variety of media. This course stresses the synthetic integration of painterly concerns through the creation of a suite of related paintings. A materials fee is assessed for this course, in addition to necessary art supplies purchased by individual students. (Studio applications videotape, and slide lectures; alternate years – fall or spring)

391 Junior Project (1)

In this course, students will plan, execute, present, and critique a project in studio art or art history selected in consultation with the art faculty. Studio majors will explore concepts and experiment with art methods and materials prior to the senior year when production focuses on the senior exhibit. Art history students will work on preliminary research for the senior thesis. All students will meet regularly with faculty individually and as a group for direction and feedback. Students may elect to take this course in conjunction with an internship or study abroad. Mandatory field trips are taken each year to New York City and another major urban art center. (Fall)

392 Junior Seminar (1)

This is a supervised open studio and seminar course with assigned readings and research in contemporary art and art historical methodologies. This course will build on the work done in the junior project, internship, or study abroad of the previous semester. Each studio major will produce a series of related artworks while doing graded research on an aspect of the art world. Art history students will continue to work on their thesis projects while writing regular critiques of the work produced in the studio section of the course and preparing assignments on readings. Mandatory field trips are taken each year to New York City and another major urban art center. (Spring)

398 Honors Research (3-6)

See Catalog.

442 Directed Studies (1-6)

See Catalog.

444 Internship (1-6)

See Catalog.

446 Readings (1-9)

See Catalog.

448 Research (1-9)

See Catalog.

450 Seminar (1-9)

See Catalog.

452 Special Projects (1-9)

See Catalog.

458 Special Topics (1-6)

See Catalog.

491 Senior Seminar (2)

(PR: SR status and ART major) This course aims to focus the student’s development toward the final senior exhibition or thesis to be presented at the end of the year. The faculty will work with each student to develop his or her individual artistic vision or art historical position through regular individual and group critiques. Because the medium, subject, and style of the work produced will vary, the principle emphasis will be on the formal concerns and presentation of the art.These issues will be addressed in critiques, reading, and research. Studio majors will strive to integrate ideas of concept, form, and content in the preparation of the artist statement for the final exhibit. Art history students will finalize the research and complete a draft of the final thesis. Mandatory field trips are taken each year to New York City or another major urban art center. (Fall)

492 Senior Show (2)

(PR: ART 491) Studio majors will focus on the preparation of the final exhibition and the presentation of a carefully crafted artist statement. Art history students will revise and refine the thesis for presentation either in a public symposium or the Honors Research Symposium in the spring. Critique of ongoing studio work and writing will take place prior to the senior show and/ or symposium. Studio majors will submit a slide portfolio or CD, and art history students, a bound copy of the thesis for review by the art faculty. A formal critique will be made of all work submitted. Mandatory field trips are taken each year to New York City or another major urban art center. (Spring)

ARTH

110 Survey of Western Art I (3)

The art of the Western world from its earliest known examples in caves of France and Spain up to the beginning Renaissance ideals in art and architecture of Western Europe, with a brief view of some of the arts of the Islamic world created during that same era. Examines the way that the visual arts and architecture gives expression to a culture’s values and ideas about life, death, and spirituality. (Fall)

120 Survey of Western Art II (3)

This course surveys the art of Western Europe and the Americas from the Renaissance through the 20th century. Particular attention is paid to change in social and cultural institutions leading to the development of modernism. (Spring)

210 Medieval Art and Architecture (3)

A survey of art and architecture created in Europe beginning in the late Roman Empire though the 14th century. (Fall, Alternate years)

220 Art in Italy, 1400-1700 (3)

A survey of art and architecture created in Italy between 1400 and 1700 AD. Art and architecture are examined in relation to the philosophical, scientific, and religious debates of the era. (Spring, Alternate years)

221 Art in Northern Europe, 1400-1700 (3)

A survey of the art and architecture in European countries outside of Italy, especially Flanders, the Netherlands, France, and Spain. Of particular interest are the roles played by the Reformation and Counter-Reformation in art production. (Spring, Alternate years)

230 Art in Europe, 1700-1850 (3)

A survey of art and architecture created in Western Europe from 1700-1850.The development of the independent gallery system and the role of art academies, leading to modernist movements in the 19th century are emphasized. (Fall, Alternate years)

240 Art in Europe, 1850-1950 (3)

A survey of the art and architecture created in Western Europe during the late 19th and through the 20th century. Major modernist movements and avant-garde styles are discussed in depth. (Fall, Alternate years)

245 Art in the United States, 1900-Present (3)

A survey of the art and architecture created in the United States beginning in the early 20th century around the time of the Armory Show in New York in 1913. Major movements throughout the century will be examined, along with the special circumstances of art making in the United States. (Fall, Alternate years)

310 Modern Art Theory and Criticism (3)

An examination of the writings of artists and critics of the late 19th and 20th centuries whose works construct the history of modernism in the arts. (Spring, Alternate years)

320 Topics in Latin American Art (3)

A survey of the art of one region or country in Latin America, such as Mesoamerican art, Caribbean art, South American art, Mexican art, or Brazilian art. (Spring, Alternate years)

410 Contemporary Art: Theory and Practices (3)

An examination of the visual arts of the 20th century and into the 21st century, emphasizing theory, criticism, and exhibition strategies related particularly to news media. (Spring, Alternate years)

450 Art History Seminar (3)

A seminar devoted to a topic central to the history of art. This course is designed to offer students the opportunity to do an in-depth analysis of artworks, understand and apply theoretical frameworks to the interpretation of culture, and develop and present research. (Spring, Alternate years)

442 Directed Studies (1-6)

See Catalog.

444 Internship (1-6)

See Catalog.

446 Readings (1-9)

See Catalog.

448 Research (1-9)

See Catalog.

450 Seminar (1-9)

See Catalog.

452 Special Projects (1-9)

See Catalog.

458 Special Topics (1-6)

See Catalog.