Studio Art Course Offerings

101 Art Appreciation (3) An introduction to the arts of painting, sculpture, and architecture. As a general survey course, emphasis is placed both on the development of an informed art vocabulary and on the exercise of those perceptual and cognitive skills which enhance aesthetic experiences in the arts. (Lectures, slide presentations, field trips, and creative applications.)

110 Studio Foundations: Drawing (3) A foundation course that explores various approaches to a range of drawing mediums from landscape and still-life to human anatomy, from rendering to nonobjective abstraction. A variety of wet and dry media is employed in a series of projects and exercises designed to enhance both eye-hand coordination and perceptual acuity. No previous drawing experience is required. A materials fee is assessed for this course, in addition to necessary art supplies purchased by individual students. (Studio applications and field trips)

120 Studio Foundations: 2-D (3) A foundation course surveying the elements and principles of visual organization in two-dimensional art. Perceptual and conceptual skills are enhanced through a series of experimental studio projects focused on composition and color theory. No previous design experiences are required. A materials fee is assessed for this course, in addition to necessary art supplies purchased by individual students. (Lectures and studio applications)

122 Studio Foundations: 3-D (3) A foundations course surveying materials, concepts, and principles of visual structure/organization in the dimensional world. Through a series of problem solving projects, readings, and class discussion, students will gain insight into the basic language of three-dimensional design. A materials fee is assessed for this course, in addition to necessary art supplies purchased by individual students.

230 Painting I (3) (PR: ART 110 and 120, or POI) An introduction to the theory and practice of painting in oils, stressing color and surface in response to direct visual observations. This course covers a range of materials and technical skills that are presented with frequent reference to the broader history of painting. A materials fee is assessed for this course, in addition to necessary art supplies purchased by individual students. (Demonstration, painting on location in the landscape, and studio application)

240 Sculpture (3) (PR: ART 110 and 120, or POI) A study of both additive and subtractive approaches to sculptural representation in the context of art history and executed in a variety of media such as clay, stone, plaster, metals, wood, and glass. A materials fee is assessed for this course, in addition to necessary art supplies purchased by individual students. (Demonstrations and studio applications, Alternate years)

260 Printmaking I (3) (PR: ART 110 and 120, or POI) An introduction to the techniques of relief and intaglio printing processes such as woodcut, linocut, etching, aquatint, and dry point. A materials fee is assessed for this course, in addition to necessary art supplies purchased by individual students. (Demonstrations and studio applications, Alternate years)

262 Printmaking II: Screen Printing (2) (PR: ART 110 and 120, or POI) An introduction to the techniques and processes of screen-printing with an emphasis on fine arts applications. A materials fee is assessed for this course, in addition to necessary art supplies purchased by individual students. (Demonstrations and studio applications, Alternate years)

280 Art for the Child (3) A study of the child’s creative growth in arts and crafts. Designed to help the classroom teacher develop the creative skills that enhance instruction in all content areas while facilitating a quality art program within the broader context of a general classroom environment. This class is limited to majors in Early Childhood Education, Christian Education, and Art. Other students may contact the art department with a request to be enrolled on appeal. A materials fee is assessed for this course, in addition to necessary art supplies purchased by individual students. (Lectures and studio applications)

291 The Expressive Process: The Open Studio (3) This class will explore a selection of expressive art practices commonly used to enhance personal development, creativity, and spiritual experience. It will address the devotional and developmental uses of art by people seeking an enhanced practice of creativity, personal vocation, and social engagement. This course combines historical, theoretical, and experiential learning in an applied studio format with supplemental lecture, film, and assigned text presentation. By participation in expressive arts activities and reflecting on the products and processes, students will have an opportunity to learn how studio art practice can help a person achieve improved awareness of self and others as well as develop an enhanced sense of personal responsibility and self efficacy, while learning to more effectively deal with setbacks, disappointments, or confusing experiences, overcome creative blocks, and more consciously engage the process of personal growth and development. A materials fee is assessed for this course, in addition to necessary art supplies purchased by individual students.

292 Expressive Process: Art Therapy (3) This class will introduce students to concepts of art therapy in the broader context of the expressive tradition. It will address the therapeutic and developmental uses of the art by people who experience illness, trauma, or challenges in living, as well as by people without trauma or psychopathology who seek personal development and enhanced psychological and social well being. This course combines theoretical and experiential learning in lecture and studio formats. By participating in expressive arts activities and reflecting on the products and processes, students will have the opportunity to learn how studio art practice can help a person achieve improved awareness of self and others, cope with symptoms of stress, more effectively deal with the after effects of traumatic experiences, and more consciously engage in the process of personal growth and development. A materials fee is assessed for this course, in addition to necessary art supplies purchased by individual students.

307 3-D Modeling and Animation (4) (PR: CSC 201 or 241 ● XL: CSC 307) This course explores concepts and methodologies for creating and exploring 3D graphics and animation. This class will introduce fundamental 3D theories and principles of computer modeling and animation. The class will also explore the history, development, and theories behind modeling and animation. Essential concepts will be made concrete through a major term-long team project in which student teams will develop their own 3D models that are then used in a short animation.

308 Graphics Programming and Animation (3) (PR: CSC 241 ● XL: CSC 308) This course introduces the student to programming that draws 2D or 3D images on the screen. In particular, we will study graphics packages that enable interactive drawing and animation in 2D and 3D spaces. (Alternate years)

310 Life Drawing (3) (PR: ART 110 and 120, or POI) An extensive study of artistic anatomy and the expressive potential of the human form. Drawing from the model and skeleton with a wide array of drawing and painting media. A materials fee is assessed for this course, in addition to necessary art supplies purchased by individual students. (Lecture/demonstrations and studio applications, Alternate years)

336 Painting II (3) (PR: ART 230, 232 or 234) An exploration of the form/content relationship in the practice of painting in a variety of media; this course stresses the synthetic integration of painterly concerns through the creation of a suite of related paintings. A materials fee is assessed for this course, in addition to necessary art supplies purchased by individual students. (Studio applications videotape, and slide lectures)

391 Junior Project (1) In this course, students will plan, execute, present, and critique a project in studio art or art history selected in consultation with the art faculty. Studio majors will explore concepts and experiment with art methods and materials prior to the senior year when production focuses on the senior exhibit. Art history students will work on preliminary research for the senior thesis. All students will meet regularly with faculty individually and as a group for direction and feedback. Students may elect to take this course in conjunction with an internship or study abroad. Mandatory field trips are taken each year to New York City and another major urban art center. (Fall)

392 Junior Seminar (1) This is a supervised open-studio and seminar course with assigned readings and research in contemporary art and art historical methodologies. This course will build on the work done in the junior project, internship, or study abroad of the previous semester. Each studio major will produce a series of related artworks while doing graded research on an aspect of the art world. Art history students will continue to work on their thesis projects while writing regular critiques of the work produced in the studio section of the course and preparing assignments on readings. Mandatory field trips are taken each year to New York City and another major urban art center. (Spring)

398 Honors Research (3-6) See Catalog.

442 Directed Studies (1-6) See Catalog.

444 Internships (1-6) See Catalog.

446 Readings (1-9) See Catalog.

448 Research (1-9) See Catalog.

450 Seminar (1-9) See Catalog.

452 Special Projects (1-9) See Catalog.

458 Special Topics (1-6) See Catalog.

491 Senior Seminar (2) (PR: SR status and ART major) This course aims to focus the student’s development toward the final senior exhibition or thesis to be presented at the end of the year. The faculty will work with each student to develop her or his individual artistic vision or art historical position through regular individual and group critiques. Because the medium, subject, and style of the work produced will vary, the principle emphasis will be on the formal concerns and presentation of the art. These issues will be addressed in critiques, reading, and research. Studio majors will strive to integrate ideas of concept, form, and content in the preparation of the artist statement for the final exhibit. Art history students will finalize the research and complete a draft of the final thesis. Mandatory field trips are taken each year to New York City and another major urban art center. (Fall)

492 Senior Show (2) (PR: ART 491) Studio majors will focus on the preparation of the final exhibition and the presentation of a carefully crafted artist statement. Art history students will revise and refine the thesis for presentation either in a pubic symposium or the Honors Research Symposium in the spring. Critique of ongoing studio work and writing will take place prior to the senior show and/ or symposium. Studio majors will submit a slide portfolio or CD and art history students, a bound copy of the thesis for review by the art faculty. A formal critique will be made of all work submitted. Mandatory field trips are taken each year to New York City and another major urban art center. (Spring)