Course Offerings

Requirements for the Minor in Southern Studies

Students must complete eighteen hours for the minor in southern studies, including SOST 205 and 15 hours chosen from ENGL 209, 334, 347; ENGL/SOST 314, 315; HIST 3211, 3240; HIST 3245/RELG 356; MUSC 1101; PLSC 301, PLSC 319; SOC 303; SOST 442, 444, 448, or 458.

SOST • Southern Studies

205 Introduction to Southern Studies (3)

(PR: ENGL 110 and 111) An introduction to the culture, history, literature, and art of the South, covering periods from the earliest settlers to contemporary times.

442 Directed Studies (3)

(Open to Southern Studies minors who have completed at least nine additional hours towards the Southern Studies minor, including SOST 205) Designed to allow the student to pursue a topic of special interest under the direction of a faculty member who teaches courses that count towards the SOST minor.  See catalog.

444 Internships (1-3) See catalog.

448 Research (1-3) See catalog.

458 Special Topics (1-6) See catalog.

ENGL • English

209 African American Literature (3)

(PR: ENGL 110 and 111) This course will survey literary production by African Americans from the mid-18th century to the late 20th century. Essays, autobiographies, speeches, poems, novels, short stories, plays, songs, and films will allow us to see the multiple ways in which African Americans have put into words and made sense of their experiences within American society across the centuries. But such works also help us in understanding and coming to terms with significance of race (as well as class, gender, sexuality, and religion) in America’s past and present. (Alternate years)

334 Southern Women’s Writing (3)

(PR: ENGL 110 and 111• Post-1900 literature) This course examines how modern and contemporary women writers represent and imagine the south in their texts—including, novels, short stories, autobiographies, and poems—and, in doing so, how they illuminate the dynamic of race, ethnicity, gender, class, and sexuality within 20th and 21st century southern society. (Alternate years)

347 Southern Jewish Literature (3)

(PR: ENGL 110 and 111•Post-1900 literature) This course examines works by Jewish authors who are natives or transplants to the American South but who, in either case, consider the South their home. This “braided” community–Jews, Christians, Southerners, Americans–helps us understand the South to be far less homogeneous than otherwise imagined. Selected authors covering an array of literary genres include Uhry, Kushner, Greene, and Mirvitz.(Alternate years)

ENGL • English/SOST • Southern Studies

314 Southern Literature (3)

(PR: ENGL 206 for English majors/minors or SOST 205 for Southern studies minors•XL: ENGL 314) A survey of signifcant Southern writing from Colonial days to the present. Particular attention will be paid to the writers of the 20th century. (Alternate years)

315 Appalachian Literature (3)

(PR: ENGL 110 and 111; ENGL 206 for English majors/minors or SOST 205 for Southern Studies minors•XL: ENGL 315) A survey of Appalachian fiction, poetry, and drama from the 1920s to the present, focusing on cultural identity, landscape, musical and religious heritage, regionalism, and migration experiences.

HIST • History

3211 Young America (3)

This course studies issues confronting a new nation, including the rise of democracy, the exploration of the frontier and westward expansion, slavery and the South, benevolence and reform, and sectionalism and the Civil War.

3240 History of the South (3)

This course is a survey of the history and culture of the South from the period of early settlement to the present. Special attention will be given to the Old South, the institution of slavery, the Civil War and Reconstruction, the New South, the Civil Rights movement, and the South in the Modern Era.

3245 African-American History (3)

(XL: RELG 356) This course is an examination of the African-American contribution to the life of the American people from the period of slavery to the present. Particular emphasis is placed on the relationship of African-American religion to American history and culture. (Alternate years)

MUSC • Music

1101 American Popular Music (3)

A general survey of popular music in America from the middle of the 19th century to the present time. The principal popular music genres of Musical Theater, Jazz, Country, and Rock will be the focus of this course. Composers, performers, and performing mediums of these styles will be discussed within their religious, political, and economic context in order to gain a greater appreciation for their meaning and role in society, and place in the development of contemporary American culture.

PLSC • Political Science

301 African-Americans and the Political System (3)

An overview of the African-American struggle for social, political, and legal rights; of the constraints upon the achievement of these rights; and of the major political actors involved in this struggle. Special emphasis will be given to key court decisions, legislation, and political movements affecting African-American rights and to major electoral breakthroughs in promoting African-American political empowerment. (Alternate years)

319 Southern Politics (3)

An analysis of the contemporary politics and governments of the southern states. The course provides an understanding of political development in each of the former confederate states and an overview of driving political forces in the region such as the rise of the GOP, the empowerment of African-Americans, and the role of southerners in Congress and presidential selection. Attention is also given to the prominence of personality in the politics of the South. (Alternate years)

SOC • Sociology

303 Sociology of the Contemporary South (3)

(PR: SOC 201 or POI) An examination of continuity and change in the subculture of the American South. Consideration will be given to regional identity, stereotypes, and images and to institutions found in the contemporary South. Also includes discussion of the South’s future as a distinctive region. (Alternate years)