The English curriculum at PC is both traditional and innovative at the same time. You can take courses in the classics, like Shakespeare, the Romantics, Chaucer, the American Renaissance, or African American literature. We also offer courses in contemporary areas like Postcolonial Literature, Southern Women’s Writing, and the Modern Novel. Consider courses in film, such as Introduction to World Cinema and Silent Film. Or perhaps you’d like to take some creative writing workshops or a literary theory class. Several members of our department direct interdisciplinary minors such as Media Studies, Southern Studies, and Women’s and Gender Studies.

Major in English

The major in English requires 33 or 39 hours taught at or above the 2000-level, including

  • ENGL 4100 and 4003;

Select three hours from the following: ENGL 2101, 2102, or 2103;

  • ENGL 2101, 2102, or 2103;

Select at least nine hours from the following:

  • ENGL 2201, 2202, 2203, 2204, 2205, 2206, 2207, or  2208;

Select at least three hours of Medieval or Renaissance literature from the following:

  • ENGL 3101, 3102, , 3110, or 3111;

Select three hours of 18th or 19th-century literature from the following:

  • ENGL 3120, 3130, 3131, 3132,or 3201,

Select three hours of pre-1900 literature from the following:

  • ENGL 3101, 3102, 3110, 3111, 3120, 3130, 3131, 3132, or 3201;

Select three hours of post-1900 literature from the following:

  • ENGL 3001, 3301, 3302, 3360, ENGL 3361/SOST 315, 3362, 3370, 3371,3372, 3380, or 3520;

And select six hours of electives from CRWR, ENGL, or MDST 230.

Students who seek honors in English must complete an additional six hours in ENGL electives, including three hours chosen from ENGL 2101, 2102, or 2103 (if not chosen above) and three additional hours of ENGL 4005 or other ENGL elective as approved by the Department. Students must also complete a substantial thesis (30 pages minimum) and present their research.

English major card

Major in English with Creative Writing Concentration

Students majoring in English with a concentration in creative writing must complete 33 hours taught at or above the 2000-level, including

  • CRWR 4100;

Select three hours from the following:

  • ENGL 2101, 2102, or 2103;

Select nine hours from the following:

  • ENGL 2201, 2202, 2203, 2204, 2205, 2206, 2207, or 2208;

Select three hours of pre-1900 literature from the following:

  • ENGL 3101, 3102, 3110, 3111, 3120, 3130, 3131, 3132, or 3201;

Select three hours of post-1900 literature from the following:

  • ENGL 3001, 3301, 3302, 3360, 3361, 3370, 3371, 3372, 3380, or 3520;

Select six hours of workshop courses from the following:

  • CRWR 2100, 2200, 2300, or 2400;

Select three hours from the following:

  • CRWR 2100, 2200, 2300, or 2400 (if not chosen for workshop credit), 2500, 4003, 4005, 4007;
  • ENGL 2101, 3650;
  • MDST 230;
  • THEA 2300, 2301, 3000, 3001;
  • or appropriate courses as approved by creative writing director

Select three hours from either CRWR 4000 or 4003.

English Major with Creative Writing Concentration major card

Major in English with Minor in Secondary Education Certification to Teach High School English

A student who wants to be certified to teach English in the high school setting must complete 33 hours of ENGL coursework taught at or above the 2000-level, including

  • ENGL 2101, 2102 or 2103, 3001, 3002, 3111, and 4100;

Select nine hours from the following:

  • ENGL 2201, 2202, 2203, 2204, 2205, 2206, or 2207;

Select three hours of pre-1900 literature from the following:

  • ENGL 3101, 3102, 3110, 3120, 3130, 3131, 3132, or 3201;

Select three hours of post-1900 literature from the following:

  • ENGL 3362, 3370, 3371, 3372, 3380, 3520

In addition, students must complete all other courses required for teacher certification and meet the criteria for acceptance into the Teacher Education Program. See catalog.

English Education major card.

Minor in English

Students who minor in English must complete 18 hours, including

  • ENGL 1001 and 1002;

Select three hours from the following:

  • ENGL 2201, 2202, 2203, 2204, 2205, 2206, or 2207 or 2208;

Select three hours from 3000- or 4000-level literature courses;

Select six hours of electives from CRWR, ENGL, or MDST 230.

English minor card

Minor in Creative Writing

Students minoring in creative writing must complete 18 hours, including

  • CRWR 4000, CRWR 4100 and ENGL 1002;
  • Select three hours of creative writing workshop coursework selected from 2100, 2200, 2300, or 2400;
  • Select six additional hours from
    • CRWR 2100, 2200, 2300, or 2400 (if not chosen for workshop credit), 2500, 4005, 4007;
    • ENGL 2101, 3650;
    • MDST 230;
    • THEA 2300, 2301, 3000, or 3001
    • or appropriate courses as approved by creative writing director

Note: See also major in English: Creative Writing Concentration.

Creative Writing minor card

Minor in Media Studies

Requirements for the Minor in Media Studies with Business Concentration
The minor in media studies with the business concentration requires completion of 21 to 24 hours, including ACCT 203; BADM 307 and 353; ECON 201; MDST 230; an internship of three to six hours (MDST 444); and three hours selected from BADM 325, or SPCH 201.

Requirements for the Minor in Media Studies with Journalism and Communications Concentration
The minor in media studies with the journalism concentration requires completion of 18 to 19 hours chosen from one of two options:

On-Campus Option:
MDST 230 and MDST 444 for a minimum of three semester hours; three hours of writing electives chosen from CRWR 2100, 2200, 2300, 2400, 4000; three to four hours of foundations electives chosen from ART 230, 240,260, BADM 307, BADM/PHIL 316, CSC 1231-1231L, 307, 320, ENGL 2101, 2102, STAT 319, SPCH 201, or THEA 1200; three hours of theory electives chosen from ENGL 2103, PHIL 203, 205, 314, BADM/PHIL 316, PLSC 312, or WGST 225, and three hours of film electives chosen from ENGL 2208/FILM 210, ENGL 3510/FILM 320, ENGL 3500/FILM 323, ENGL 3511/FILM 327, or FILM/FREN 322.

Washington, DC Option:
MDST 230 and 15 to 16 hours of journalism taken with the Washington Semester Program. (See the Associate Dean of Career Services and Student Programs or the English Department for information on the Washington Semester Program.)

Minor in Women’s and Gender Studies

Students who minor in women’s and gender studies must complete 18 hours, including

  • SOC 363,
  • WGST 225

Select 12 hours from the following:

  • ENGL 3370, 3371, 3372;
  • HIST 3241, 3640;
  • PHIL 360;
  • PSYC 311, 330;
  • SOC 302, 366;
  • WGST/PHIL 323
  • WGST 258, 444, 452, or 458

CO = Co-requisite, POI = Permission of Instructor, PR = Prerequisite, RE = Recommended, XL = Cross-listed

1001 Introduction to Composition (3)

Students will develop proficiency in composition through a focus on close critical reading and writing as a process, including planning, drafting, revising, proofreading, and editing essay drafts. (Fall and Spring)

1002 Introduction to Literature (3)

(PR: ENGL 1001) This course focuses on themes and genres across a variety of literary texts. Students will write argument-based essays on literature that incorporate secondary sources. (Spring)

1010 English for International Students (3)

English language course for international students with TOEFL scores between 500 and 600.It emphasizes four-skills-language development (listening, speaking, reading, and writing), as well as the critical thinking and cultural skills needed for academic success.

2101 Studies in Linguistics (3)

(PR: ENGL 1001 and 1002) A survey of the history of the English language, an introduction to modern theories of English grammar, and a rigorous review of usage rules for written English. (Spring)

2102 Research Methods (3)

(PR: ENGL 1001 and 1002) This course introduces students to the various research methods and practices used by literary and interdisciplinary scholars; guides students in identifying and evaluating secondary sources for use in research-based essays and projects; and asks students to apply these methods in various writing forms that comprise the research process (e.g., topic statement, research questions, abstract, annotated bibliography, and research-based final paper). Students may not take this course after taking the Senior Capstone course. (Spring)

2103 Introduction to Literary Theory and Criticism (3)

(PR: ENGL 1001 and 1002) A survey of major works of literary theory and criticism, beginning with classical criticism and ending with contemporary theory. Organized by historical period, the course evaluates the evolution of critical practices, emphasizing the interconnectedness of literature and theory while developing awareness of diverse methods of interpretation. (Alternate years)

2201 Survey of British Literature I (3)

(PR: ENGL 1001 and 1002) Individual works by major writers of British literature from Beowulf to 1798 are studied critically in chronological order, with some attention to backgrounds and characteristics of respective literary periods. (Fall)

2202 Survey of British Literature II (3)

(PR: ENGL 1001 and 1002) Individual works by major writers of British literature from 1798 to the present are studied critically in chronological order, with some attention to backgrounds and characteristics of respective literary periods. (Spring)

2203 Survey of American Literature I (3)

(PR: ENGL 1001 and 1002) A survey of American literature from the Age of Faith to the Age of Reason to the Romantic Age with emphases on the essays, poems, and fiction of Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorne, Melville, and Whitman. A communication and evaluation of the history of ideas revealed in early American literature and relevant today. (Fall)

2204 Survey of American Literature II (3)

(PR: ENGL 1001 and 1002) A discussion and evaluation of the history of ideas in America from the Civil War to the present, including readings from Mark Twain and Emily Dickinson to Louise Erdrich and August Wilson. Realistic, naturalistic, existentialistic, modern, and contemporary thought and literature will be studied. (Spring)

2205 Survey of African-American Literature (3)

(PR: ENGL 1001 and 1002) This course will survey literary production by African-Americans from the mid-18th century to the late 20th century. Essays, autobiographies, speeches, poems, novels, short stories, plays, songs, and films will allow us to see the multiple ways in which African-Americans have put into words and made sense of their experiences within American society across the centuries. But such works also help us in understanding and coming to terms with significance of race (as well as class, gender, sexuality, and religion) in America’s past and present. (Alternate years)

2206 Survey of World Literature in Translation (3)

(PR: ENGL 1001 and 1002) A survey of world literature from the origins of writing to modern times.Texts range from pre-Biblical to pre-Columbian, and include early Indian epic, classical Greek drama, medieval tales from East Asia and Western Europe, Arabic verse, and West African choral storytelling. Key themes include mythic treatment of tribal relations; lyric treatments of love; epic tales of morality and action; problems of gender and power; and the relations between religion and literature. (Alternate years)

2207 Survey of World Literature in English (3)

(PR: ENGL 1001 and 1002) A survey of world literature from early modernity to the contemporary.Texts may be drawn from lyric poetry, drama, testimonies, travel accounts, biography, autobiography, short stories, or novels, among others. (Alternate years)

2208 Survey of World Cinema (3)

(PR: ENGL 1001 and 1002) A survey of the important genres, theories, techniques, and international movements of film history. Representative films from the silent era to the present, and from America to Europe and Asia, will be covered. (Alternate years)

2301 The Southern Film Experience (3)

(PR: ENGL 1001 and 1002) This course surveys films made in, about, or set in the American South and that seek to capture the places, events, themes, culture, and folkways associated with this region.

2400 Writing Tutor Practicum (1)

(PR: ENGL 1001, 1002, POI, and selection as a writing center tutor • Offered on a pass/fail basis and may not be counted toward the ENGL major) A practical course in how to help others with writing through a writer-centered approach. Students will study methods for effective tutoring in writing with actual experience in the writing center. (Fall and Spring)

2500 Special Topics (3)

3001 Adolescent Literature (3)

(PR: ENGL 1001, 1002, and POI • Post-1900 literature course) A survey of adolescent literature (including print and nonprint 131 media) and informational materials suited to the use of junior and senior high school students. Attention given to reading interests and needs of the adolescent. Also considered is the relation of the teacher to the school library program or media center and current trends in teaching with books. (Alternate years)

3002 The Teaching of Composition (3)

(PR: ENGL 1001 and 1002) Beginning with a brief review of grammar, the course introduces future secondary English teachers to composition theory and the teaching of writing. Students will gain practical experience in working individually with students and grading essays. (Alternate years)

3101 Topics in Medieval Literature (3)

(PR: ENGL 1001 and 1002 • Pre-1900 literature • May be taken more than once for credit) A survey of significant works from the medieval period, excluding Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales.The course will focus on one unifying theme, such as Arthurian Literature, Medieval Romance, Women in the Middle Ages, et. al. (Alternate years)

3102 Chaucer (3)

(PR: ENGL 1001 and 1002 • Pre-1900 literature) A study of the works of England’s first major poet, with special attention to the Canterbury Tales.The course will include collateral readings about sources for Chaucer’s work and the cultural milieu of 14th century England. (Alternate years)

3110 Renaissance Poetry and Drama (3)

(PR: ENGL 1001 and 1002 • Pre-1900 literature) An application of Renaissance intellectual history to the study of the overreacher and the Petrarchan and Ovidian love traditions in 16th- and 17th-century English poetry and non-Shakespearean drama. (Alternate years)

3111 Shakespeare (3)

(PR: ENGL 1001 and 1002 • Pre-1900 literature) A critical study of representative histories, comedies, tragedies, and romances, with emphasis on Shakespeare’s development as a dramatic artist. (Fall)

3120 18th Century Poetry and Prose (3)

(PR: ENGL 1001 and 1002; 2000-level literature course or POI • Pre-1900 literature course) An examination of the chief works of Dryden, Swift, Pope, Johnson, and others against the background of 18th-century society and thought. Collateral reading; term project. (Alternate years)

3130 Poetry and Prose of the Romantic Period (3)

(PR: ENGL 1001 and 1002; 2000-level literature course or POI • Pre-1900 literature course) An examination of the chief poems and essays of Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, Keats, Lamb, Hazlitt, Wollstonecraft, and De Quincey. Collateral reading; critical essays and analyses. (Alternate years)

3131 The English Novel to 1900 (3)

(PR: ENGL 1001 and 1002 • Pre-1900 literature) A study of the English novel from its emergence in the 18th century through its eminence in the 19th century, including such novelists as Fielding, Richardson, Austen, the Brontës, Dickens, Eliot, Hardy, and others. (Alternate years)

3132 The Victorian Age (3)

(PR: ENGL 1001 and 1002; 2000-level literature course or POI • Pre-1900 literature) An examination of the chief writers and their work against the background of 19th century life and thought, including Tennyson, Browning, Arnold, Ruskin, Carlyle, Mill, the Rossettis, Morris, Wilde, and others. Critical essays and analyses. (Alternate years)

3201 The American Renaissance (3)

(PR: ENGL 1001, 1002, and 2203 • Pre-1900 literature) A comprehensive survey of the literary flowering of 1850-1855 that produced the transcendentalist poetry and prose of Emerson, Thoreau, and Whitman and the novels of Hawthorne and Melville. (Alternate years)

3301 The Modern British and American Novel (3)

(PR: ENGL 1001 and 1002 • Post-1900 literature) A critical survey of the development of the novel in the 20th century, focusing on major authors. The reading list is determined from the following authors of the Modern Period: Forster, Joyce, Conrad, Woolf, Lawrence, Faulkner, Hemingway, and Fitzgerald. Post WWII and postmodern authors represented may include Ellison, Morrison, Pynchon, M. Amis, Fowles, Flannery O’Connor, Bellow, and Barth. (Alternate years)

3302 Modern Poetry (3)

(PR: ENGL 1001 and 1002 • Post-1900 literature) A survey of modern British and American poets, with particular attention to W.B. Yeats, T.S. Eliot, and Robert Frost. Collateral readings and selected analyses. (Alternate years)

3360 Southern Literature (3)

(PR: ENGL 1001, 1002, and POI; ENGL 2203 for English majors/minors or SOST 205 for Southern Studies minors • XL: SOST 314 • Post-1900 literature course) A survey of significant Southern writing from Colonial days to the present. Particular attention will be paid to the writers of the 20th century. (Alternate years)

3361 Appalachian Literature (3)

(PR: ENGL 1001, 1002; ENGL 2203 for English majors/minors or SOST 205 for Southern Studies minors; POI • XL: SOST 315 • Post-1900 literature) A survey of Appalachian fiction, poetry, and drama from the 1920s to the present, focusing on cultural identity, landscape, musical and religious heritage, regionalism, and migration experiences. (Alternate years)

3362 Southern Jewish Literature (3)

(PR: ENGL 1001 and 1002 • Post-1900 literature) This course examines works by Jewish authors who are natives or transplants to the American South but who, in either case, consider the South their home. This “braided” community–Jews, Christians, Southerners, Americans–helps us understand the South to be far less homogeneous than otherwise imagined. Selected authors covering an array of literary genres include Uhry, Kushner, Greene, and Mirvitz. (Alternate years)

3370 Women’s Literature (3)

(PR: ENGL 1001 and 1002 • Post-1900 literature) A critical study of American and British women writers, which may examine the following themes: myths of the female, the woman artist, the female bildungsroman, love and friendship, communities of women, women and war, women’s place in the nation, and female spirituality. (Alternate years)

3371 Women’s World Literature (3)

(PR: ENGL 1001 and 1002 • Post-1900 literature) A complement to ENGL 3370. An introduction to women’s literature written by artists from across the globe (including Africa, the Middle East, Asia, and Latin America) which focuses on texts composed after 1900. (Alternate years)

3372 Southern Women’s Writing (3)

(PR: ENGL 1001 and 1002 • Post-1900 literature) This course examines how modern and contemporary women writers represent and imagine the South in their texts—including, novels, short stories, autobiographies, and poems—and, in doing so, how they illuminate the dynamic of race, ethnicity, gender, class, and sexuality within 20th and 21st century Southern society. (Alternate years)

3380 Holocaust Literature (3)

(PR: ENGL 1001 and 1002 • Post-1900 literature) This course will examine the intentional destruction of European Jewry through a variety of literary forms: memoir, fiction, poetry, and film. Selected authors include Levi, Spiegelmam, Kosinski, Applefeld, and Borowski (Fall, odd years)

3500 Film and American Culture (3)

(PR: ENGL 1001 and 1002) A study of the way in which social, political, economic, and cultural forces in America have influenced or been depicted by or in American film. Selected directors whose films will be viewed include Griffith, Chaplin, Hitchcock, Altman, Levinson, Tarantino, and others. (Alternate years)

3510 Silent Film (3)

(PR: ENGL 1001, 1002, and POI) A survey of film’s formative years, from the Edison kinetoscopes of the 1890s to the international flowering of the 1920s, focusing on thematic trends, development of genres, and increasing complexity of film grammar. Directors whose works we will study will include Griffith, Eisenstein, Vidor, Lang, Chaplin, Murnau, Gance, and von Sternberg. (Alternate years)

3511 Film Noir (3)

(PR: ENGL 1001, 1002, and POI) A survey of the classic era (1941-1958) of Film Noir, examining the literary and cinematic influences, visual style, and psychological and gender issues present in the Noir canon. We will also examine the resurgence of Noir during the decades on either side of the Millennium. (Alternate years)

3520 Postcolonial Literature and Film (3)

(PR: ENGL 1001 and 1002 • Post-1900 literature) This course focuses on regions of the world that, in the mid-20th century, gained political independence after years of colonial rule (Southeast Asia, Africa, the Caribbean) and explores the rich hybridity of the literature and cinema they have produced in the past half-century. Questions raised by globalization, transnationality, and diasporic identity will also be addressed. (Alternate years)

3600 Practicum in the Writing Center (1)

(PR: ENGL 1001, 1002, and 2400 • May be taken more than once for credit; offered on a pass/fail basis and may not count toward the English major) A practical course in helping other students with writing through a writer-centered approach. The course includes mentoring beginning tutors, tutoring writers, and working on projects in the Writing Center. (Fall and Spring)

3650 Advanced Writing (3)

(PR: ENGL 1001 and 1002) A study of the advanced rhetorical strategies that inform a variety of writing styles, with particular emphasis on academic writing. Students will write several essays, revise them regularly, and assemble a final portfolio of their best written work. (Alternate years)

4002 Special Projects (1-9)

4003 Honors Research (3-6)

(PR: ENGL 1001 and 1002) 4004 Readings

4005 Directed Studies (3)

(PR: ENGL 1001 and 1002) Readings and research on a topic proposed by the student and approved by the Department of English.

4006 Seminar

4007 Internship (1-3)

(May not be counted toward the English major) Internships in publishing, journalism, and related fields must be approved by the student’s adviser.

4008 Research (1-6)

4009 Special Topics (1-6)

4100 Senior Capstone in English (3)

(PR: ENGL 1001 and 1002; POI; SR status or consent of the department) Readings in literature selected by the English faculty. Course uses a seminar format in which students engage in discussion, conduct original research on a topic of their choice, and present to the class their findings in both oral and written reports. Stresses students’ skills in analysis, research, and communication. (Fall and Spring)

CO = Co-requisite, POI = Permission of Instructor, PR = Prerequisite, RE = Recommended, XL = Cross-listed

2100 Creative Writing: Poetry (3)

(PR: ENGL 1001, 1002, and POI • Only one course, CRWR 2100, 2200, 2300, or 2400, may count toward the ENGL major unless the student chooses the creative writing concentration) Students will study and be involved in the process of writing poems by producing a portfolio of work. Contemporary poems will serve as models of the craft. Honest but tactful criticism of peers’ work will be expected from each student. (Fall)

2200 Creative Writing: Short Fiction (3)

(PR: ENGL 1001, 1002, and POI • Only one course, CRWR 2100, 2200, 2300, or 2400, may count toward the ENGL major unless the student chooses the creative writing concentration) Students will study and be involved in the process of writing short fiction by producing a portfolio of work. Contemporary short stories will serve as models of the craft. Honest but tactful criticism of peers’ work will be expected from each student. (Spring)

2300 Creative Writing: Creative Nonfiction (3)

(PR: ENGL 1001, 1002, and POI • Only one course, CRWR 2100, 2200, 2300, or 2400 may count toward the ENGL major unless the student chooses the creative writing concentration) Emily Dickinson said,“Tell the truth, but tell it slant.” Using these words of inspiration and guidance, the Creative Nonfiction class will ask students to tell their own stories through personal essays that seek the essence of the story’s truth but aren’t afraid to use the artist’s many techniques and imaginative gifts to create a work that bears the “personal stamp” of that writer/artist. Each student will build a portfolio of essays that will be analyzed through the workshop process. The class will also read and critique essays from such well-known nonfiction writers as Frank McCourt, Joan Didion, Nick Flynn, Eula Biss, Frank Conroy, Mary Karr, and Ian Frazier. (Alternate years)

2400 Creative Writing: Topics in Creative Writing (3)

(PR: ENGL 1001, 1002, and POI • May be taken more than once for credit • Only one course, CRWR 2100, 2200, 2300, or 2400 may count toward the ENGL major unless the student chooses the creative writing concentration) This course will focus on one writing genre, such as screenwriting, novel writing, novella writing, graphic novel writing, etc. Students will study and be involved in the process of writing creatively by producing a portfolio of work. Contemporary works in the chosen genre will serve as models of the craft. Honest but tactful criticism of peers’ work will be expected from each student. (Alternate years)

2500 Special Topics (3)

(PR: ENGL 1001 and 1002)

4000 Advanced Creative Writing Workshop (3)

(PR: POI • Open to students majoring in English with the emphasis in creative writing or minoring in creative writing) An intensive study of the process of creative writing for advanced students. Students will work on large scale, individual writing projects (poetry portfolio, short-story collection, novel, novella, screenplay, graphic novel, etc.), as well as read extensively in their chosen genre. Honest but tactful criticism of fellow students’ work in class workshops will be required from each student. (Alternate years)

4002 Special Projects (1-6)

4003 Honors Research (3-6)

(PR: ENGL 1001 and 1002)

4005 Directed Studies (1-6)

4007 Internship (1-4)

4100 Creative Writing: Portfolio (3)

(PR: POI • Open to students majoring in English with the concentration in Creative Writing or minoring in Creative Writing) The culmination of the major or minor in Creative Writing, this course requires extensive revision of previous creative work to compile a professional portfolio. Honest, but tactful criticism of fellow students’ work in class workshops will be required from each student. (Fall)

CO = Co-requisite, POI = Permission of Instructor, PR = Prerequisite, RE = Recommended, XL = Cross-listed

225 Introduction to Women’s and Gender Studies (3)

An interdisciplinary course that studies the roles, images, contributions, and experiences of women of various races, classes, and cultures, and concludes with a research or service-learning project.

258 Special Topics (1-6)

312 Women in the Bible (3)

(PR: RELG 101 and 110, or POI • XL: RELG 312) This course will consider the biblical accounts of women as well as the range and significance of the Bible’s portrayal of women. This course is offered in conjunction with the Women’s and Studies Program. (Alternate years)

355 Womanist, Feminist, and Liberation Theo-Pedagogies (3)

(XL: R-CE 355) This course provides students the opportunity to hear and examine the voices who have historically been structurally silenced and oppressed. It will examine major issues and thinkers in womanist, feminist and liberation theologies and pedagogies through integrative study. It will move from context to theology and into the pedagogies that emerge as we engage and empower.

442 Directed Studies (3-6)

444 Internship (1-6)

448 Research (1-9)

450 Seminar (1-9)

452 Special Projects (1-9)

458 Special Topics (1-6)