Major in Education: Early Childhood

Students majoring in early childhood education must complete 64 hours, including

  • EDEC 303, 304, 310, 311, 394, 408, 409, and 410;
  • EDUC 201, 210, 314, 350, 371, and 440;
  • EDEL 306, 312, and 313;
  • PSYC 212 and 303;

Select 6 hours from the following:

  • ART 280
  • MUSC 2400
  • or PHED 310

Select 3 hours from the following:

  • HIST 3240
  • HIST 3245
  • RELG 356
  • MUSC 1151
  • SOC 360
  • SOC 364
  • an approved Maymester course
  • or a semester-long study abroad program.

Note: EDEC majors must take PSYC 201 listed on General Education form under Social Sciences

Early Childhood major card

Major in Education: Elementary

Students majoring in elementary education must complete 67 hours, including

  • EDEC 310 and 311;
  • EDEL 305, 306, 312, 313, 394, 405, 406, and 107;
  • EDUC 201, 210, 314, 350, 371, and 440;
  • ART 280;
  • GEOG 301;
  • MUSC 2400;
  • PHED 310;
  • PSYC 212 and 303

Elementary Education majors should structure their GE science courses such that a Life Science and a Physical Science are represented in the content (ex. BIOL and CHEM or BIOL and PHYS).

Major in Education: Middle School

Students who wish to teach at the middle school level will earn a B.S. in Middle School Education with a concentration in two of the following areas: language arts, mathematics, science, or social studies. A common core of professional courses totaling 48 hours is required of all students and includes

  • EDMS 341, 394, 403, 410, 411, and 412;
  • EDUC 210, 315, 325, 350, 371, and 440;
  • PSYC 201, 213, and 303.

Additional professional courses and courses specific for each area of concentration are listed below.

Concentration in Language Arts:

Students completing a concentration in language arts must complete 15 additional hours, including

  • ENGL 2101 and 3001;
  • three hours from ENGL 2208, 3500 or MDST 230;
  • three hours from ENGL 2201, 2202, 2203, 2204, 2205, 2206, or 2207;
  • and three hours from ENGL 3302, ENGL 3360/SOST 314, ENGL 3361/SOST 315, ENGL 3362, 3370, 3371, 3372, 3380, 3500, or 3520
Concentration in Mathematics:

Students completing a concentration in mathematics must complete 20 additional hours, including

  • MATH 201, 202, 210, 221, 308, and 309.

It is crucial that prospective middle school education majors planning a concentration in math take MATH 201 and MATH 221 no later than their sophomore year.

Concentration in Science:

Students seeking a concentration in science must complete 20 additional hours, including

  • BIOL 1150-1150L and 1151-1151L;
  • CHEM 101-101L;
  • PHYS 1100 and 1500.
Concentration in Social Studies:

Students seeking a concentration in social studies must complete 18 additional hours, including

  • GEOG 301 or 302;
  • HIST 2200 and 2201;
  • and PLSC 201 or 202.
Course Sequence and Major Cards

Minor in Education: Secondary

In order to teach in a secondary school setting, a student will major in the teaching area of interest (i.e., science, English, history, or mathematics) and will minor in secondary education. Students seeking the minor and Certification in Secondary Education must complete 40 hours, including

  • EDSD 301, 302, 394, 400, 401, 402, and 403;
  • EDUC 201, 210, 315, 325, 350, and 371;
  • and PSYC 213.

Students who wish to be certified to teach social studies in the high school setting must meet the requirements for the major in history.

Students who wish to be certified to teach science in the high school setting must meet the requirements for the major in biology.

Course Sequence and Major Cards:

Student Teaching/Clinical Practice is required of all Education majors.

Student teaching is the exciting culmination of your studies and usually occurs in your last semester in a local public school. During this semester, you work under the direction of a master teacher and college supervisor as you gradually assume full-time teaching responsibilities. This experience gives you the opportunity to apply the knowledge, skills and attributes you have gained over the past semesters in an actual classroom setting.

CO = Co-requisite, POI = Permission of Instructor, PR = Prerequisite, RE = Recommended, XL = Cross-listed

102 Teacher Cadet (3)

This course is a study of the history, development, organization, and practices of preschool, elementary, and secondary education This course is open to high school students only.

201 Introduction to Education (3)

Extensive treatment of the social, political, economic, and philosophical influences that have shaped American education will be covered in this course.

202 History of Education (3)

The evolution of educational theories and philosophies with particular emphasis on their impact upon educational developments in the United States.

210 Meeting the Needs of Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Students (3)

This course examines approaches, methods, and techniques for teaching culturally and linguistically diverse learners in bilingual and ESL classrooms, as well as resources available in the field. Critically analyzes and demonstrates teaching approaches based on second language acquisition research, including teaching language through content. A minimum grade of “C”is required for Education majors.

258 Special Topics (1-6)

314 Teaching the Language Arts (3)

(PR: Acceptance into Teacher Education Program; EDEC 310) This course will focus on content, pedagogy, and materials appropriate for teaching the six language arts (listening, speaking, reading, writing, viewing, and visually representing) in early childhood and elementary grades (Pre-K through 6th grade). Emphasis will be on the use of foundational knowledge in language development to design and implement an integrated, balanced literacy curriculum that provides differentiated instruction for a variety of diverse learners. A field-based practicum will be required in the course. A minimum grade of “C”is required.

315 Foundations of Reading for Middle Level and Secondary School Teachers (3)

(PR: Acceptance into Teacher Education Program) This course explores theoretical perspectives about literacy development, with a focus on cognitive, sociocultural, and critical perspectives. Students explore historical trends in the study of literacy and examine the interface between research and policy. Students will also analyze current issues related to literacy instruction and their impact on middle level and secondary students. Students will apply their learning in a middle level and high school classroom by developing and implementing instructional activities that meet the needs of all learners in the content area. A minimum grade of “C”is required.

325 Content Area Literacy for Middle Level and Secondary School Teachers (3)

(PR: Acceptance into Teacher Education Program; EDUC 315) This course prepares future teachers to understand the specific literacies in their disciplines at the middle and high school levels. Students will identify challenges faced by adolescents in reading disciplinary texts and will learn a variety of strategies that help adolescents become strategic readers and develop skills needed to be literate within the discipline. The course will address reading and writing processes, using technology to enhance instruction, and a variety of literacy activities that help students make meaning from complex and varied texts and assist them in disciplinary vocabulary acquisition. Students will have opportunities to apply what they have learned in a middle level or high school classroom. A minimum grade of “C”is required.

350 Literacy Technology and Instruction (3)

(PR: Acceptance into Teacher Education Program) This course is designed to assist teacher candidates with the necessary skills to develop instructional practices that will allow them to incorporate technologies successfully into their classrooms. Projects might include web pages, web quests, computer-based grade books, newsletters, bookmaking, etc. 371 Introduction to Special Education (3) This course provides an overview of research and practices in special education.Topics include disability categories, legal requirements and laws, collaborating with parents/families, identification 129 and assessment of students, and instructional strategies and interventions.

440 Capstone Seminar in Education (3)

(PR: Acceptance into the Teacher Education Program or consent of department chair) This course introduces students to different types of research. It provides a context for students to demonstrate their inquiry, analytical, and writing skills. Students conduct a comprehensive project or original research in the field of education and present their findings in both oral and written formats.

442 Directed Studies (1-6)

(PR: JR or SR status; departmental majors and students in teacher certification programs only; minimum GPA 2.75) Designed to allow the student to pursue a topic of special interest.

444 Internship (1-6)

(PR: minimum GPA 2.75)

446 Readings (1-6)

448 Research (1-6)

(PR: Departmental majors and students in teacher certification programs; minimum GPA 2.75)

450 Seminar (3)

452 Special Projects (1-6)

458 Special Topics (1-6)

CO = Co-requisite, POI = Permission of Instructor, PR = Prerequisite, RE = Recommended, XL = Cross-listed

303 Early Childhood Education Curriculum (3)

(PR: Acceptance into Teacher Education Program) This course will provide an overview of types of programs for young children with emphases on the history of early childhood education, current trends, and issues. Other areas of focus will include analysis of classroom design, selection of appropriate materials for young children, instructional planning, guidance, developmentally appropriate assessment and referral sources, modifications for children with disabilities, and parent/home relationships and communication.

304 Methods and Materials of Early Childhood Education (3)

(PR: Acceptance into Teacher Education Program) This course provides early childhood majors an opportunity to design developmentally appropriate instructional learning activities for young children (infancy – age 8). The course will focus on understanding and using developmentally appropriate materials and practices in content areas. Students will plan units of study that integrate curriculum areas such as literacy, math, science, social studies, health/safety, the arts, and movement. Classroom management strategies, safety considerations, diverse learners’ needs, family and community connections, and the use of technology will also be addressed.

310 Literature for Children (3)

(PR: EDUC 201) This course will provide a survey of literature for children, acquaintance with outstanding authors and illustrators in the field and genres of literature, experiences in evaluating and selecting appropriate literature for children, and techniques for presenting literature to children and integrating it across the curriculum.

311 Emergent and Early Literacy (3)

(PR: Acceptance into Teacher Education Program) This course will provide undergraduate students content knowledge and experiences in developing a literacy program for young children. The content will focus on language development; cultural and linguistic diversity; appropriate strategies for fostering emergent literacy; appropriate formal learning experiences in reading, writing, speaking, and listening; and varied assessment strategies. Students will study various methods of primary grade instruction, including, but not limited, to phonics; language experience; literature based, shared book experience; and the writing process. Students will also have opportunities to engage young children in literacy activities through field-based experiences. A minimum grade of “C”is required.

394 Practicum in Classroom Management and Organization (1)

(XL: EDEL, EDMS and EDSD 394) This practicum in classroom management and organization provides for direct involvement in the school and classroom setting during the week of preplanning and then first week of school. Students study the school context; learn effective procedures necessary for establishing, managing, and organizing a classroom; and participate in opening school experiences.

398 Honors Research (3-6)

(PR: Acceptance into Teacher Education Program)

408 Observation/Assessment; 409 Planning; 410 Teaching: Directed Teaching in Early Childhood Education (3, 3, 6)

(PR: Acceptance into Teacher Education Program; SR status and successful completion of all requirements for clinical practice) Provides for directed and closely supervised performance of student teachers in the full range of duties of classroom teachers. Regular seminars and personal conferences are an integral component of the course. A minimum grade of “C” is required to receive the College’s recommendation for certification.

442 Directed Studies (1-6)

(PR: JR or SR status; departmental majors and students in teacher certification programs; minimum GPA 2.75) Designed to allow the student to pursue a topic of special interest.

444 Internship (1-6)

(PR: minimum GPA 2.75)

446 Readings (1-6)

448 Research (1-6)

(PR: departmental majors and students in teacher certification programs; minimum GPA 2.75)

450 Seminar (3)

452 Special Projects (1-6)

458 Special Topics (1-6)

CO = Co-requisite, POI = Permission of Instructor, PR = Prerequisite, RE = Recommended, XL = Cross-listed

305 Science Methods (3)

(PR: Acceptance into Teacher Education Program) This course focuses on the content, methods, and materials for teaching science to elementary students.Teacher candidates will use elementary science standards, developmentally appropriate pedagogies, and a variety of assessment strategies in designing, implementing, and evaluating science experiences in elementary settings. Classroom management strategies, safety considerations, family and community connections, and the use of technology will also be addressed.

306 Social Studies Methods (3)

(PR: EDEC 311) This course focuses on the content, methods, and materials for teaching social studies to elementary students.Teacher candidates will use elementary social studies standards, developmentally appropriate pedagogies, and a variety of assessment strategies in designing, implementing, and evaluate social studies experiences in elementary settings. Classroom management strategies, safety considerations, family and community connections, and the use of technology will also be addressed.

312 Mathematics for Elementary Teachers (3)

(PR: EDEC 311) This course focuses on the content, methods, and materials for teaching math to elementary students.Teacher candidates will use elementary math standards, developmentally appropriate pedagogies, and a variety of assessment strategies in designing, implementing, and evaluating mathematics in elementary settings. Classroom management strategies, safety considerations, family and community connections, and the use of technology will also be addressed.

313 Teaching Reading at the Elementary Level (3)

(PR: EDEC 311 and EDMS 342) The content focuses on effective pedagogy for early and fluent readers and writers; developmentally appropriate literacy materials and experiences; cultural and linguistic diversity; and diagnosis and remediation for struggling readers and writers. Candidates will have the opportunity to engage early and fluent readers and writers in literacy activities through field-based experiences.

394 Practicum in Classroom Management and Organization (1)

(XL: EDEC, EDMS and EDSD 394) This practicum in classroom management and organization provides for direct involvement in the school and classroom setting during the week of preplanning and the first week of school. Students study the school context; learn effective procedures necessary for establishing, managing, and organizing a classroom; and participate in opening school experiences.

398 Honors Research (3)

(PR: Acceptance into Teacher Education Program)

405 Observation/Assessment; 406 Planning; and 407 Teaching: Directed Teaching in Elementary Education (3, 3, 6)

(PR: Acceptance into Teacher Education Program; SR status and successful completion of all requirements for clinical practice) Provides for directed and closely supervised performance of student teachers in the full range of duties of classroom teachers. Regular seminars and personal conferences are an integral component of the course. A minimum grade of “C”is required to receive the College’s recommendation for certification.

442 Directed Studies (1-6)

(PR: JR or SR status; departmental majors and students in teacher certification programs only; minimum GPA 2.75) Designed to allow the student to pursue a topic of special interest.

444 Internship (1-6)

(PR: minimum GPA 2.75)

446 Readings (1-6)
448 Research (1-6)

(PR: Departmental majors and students in teacher certification programs; minimum GPA 2.75)

450 Seminar (3)
452 Special Projects (1-6)
458 Special Topics (1-6)

CO = Co-requisite, POI = Permission of Instructor, PR = Prerequisite, RE = Recommended, XL = Cross-listed

341 Middle School Philosophy and Organization (3)

This course will explore the historical perspective of middle schools and examine current trends and issues in middle-level schooling, curriculum, and research. Effective programs and practices in the middle school are explored. A minimum grade of “C” is required.

394 Practicum in Classroom Management and Organization (1)

(XL: EDEC, EDEL and EDSD 394) This practicum in classroom management and organization provides for direct involvement in the school and classroom setting during the week of preplanning and the first week of school. Students study the school context; learn effective procedures necessary for establishing, managing, and organizing a classroom; and participate in opening school experiences.

398 Honors Research (3-6)

(PR: Acceptance into Teacher Education Program)

400 Middle School – Language Arts Methods (2)

(PR: EDMS 341 and 342; SR status) A study of content-specific methodology for middle-level language arts. The course focuses on planning, instruction, assessment, teacher resources, technology, and classroom climate.Teacher candidates will work with middle-level language arts students, classes, teams, and teachers and will use middle-level language arts standards.

401 Middle School – Social Studies Methods (2)

(PR: EDMS 341 and 342; SR status) A study of content-specific methodology for middle-level social studies. The course focuses on planning, instruction, assessment, teacher resources, technology, and classroom climate.Teacher candidates will work with middle-level social studies students, classes, teams, and teachers and will use middle-level standards, pedagogy, and assessments.

402 Middle School – Science Methods (2)

(PR: EDMS 341 and 342; SR status) A study of content-specific methodology for middle-level science. The course focuses on planning, instruction, assessment, teacher resources, technology, and classroom climate.Teacher candidates will work with middle level science students, classes, teams, and teachers and will use middle-level science standards, pedagogy, and assessments.

403 Middle School – Math Methods (2)

(PR: EDMS 341 and 342; SR status) A study of content-specific methodology for middle-level math. The course focuses on planning, instruction, assessment, teacher resources, technology, and classroom climate.Teacher candidates will work with middle-level math students, classes, teams, and teachers and will use middle-level math standards, pedagogy, and assessments.

410 Observation/Assessment; 411 Planning; and 412 Teaching: Directed Teaching in Middle-School Education (3, 3, 6)

(PR: Acceptance into Teacher Education Program; SR status and successful completion of all requirements for clinical practice) These courses provide for directed and closely supervised performance in the full range of duties of a middle-school teacher. Conducted in cooperating middle schools and accompanied by conferences and seminars. Students observe, assess, plan, and teach. A minimum grade of “C” is required to receive the College’s recommendation for certification.

442 Directed Studies (1-6)

(PR: JR or SR status; departmental majors and students in teacher certification programs only; minimum GPA 2.75) Designed to allow the student to pursue a topic of special interest.

444 Internship (1-6)

(PR: minimum GPA 2.75)

446 Readings (1-6)
448 Research (1-6)

(PR: Departmental majors and students in teacher certification programs; minimum GPA 2.75)

450 Seminar (3)
452 Special Projects (1-6)
458 Special Topics (1-6)

CO = Co-requisite, POI = Permission of Instructor, PR = Prerequisite, RE = Recommended, XL = Cross-listed

301 Principles and Philosophies of Education (3)

(PR: Acceptance into Teacher Education Program) Analysis of the organizational structure, curriculum development, and social influences that shape American “secondary” education as they affect the classroom teacher.

302 Methods and Materials of High School Teaching (3)

(PR: Acceptance into Teacher Education Program) Limited to those students seeking the professional teaching certificate. A consideration of current theories, methods, and materials of secondary school instruction including the development of instructional practices and materials appropriate for the secondary school and familiarization with curriculum materials. Activities and topics are individualized according to the teaching programs of those enrolled. A minimum grade of “C”is required.

394 Practicum in Classroom Management and Organization (1)

(XL: EDEC, EDMS and EDEL 394) This practicum in classroom management and organization provides for direct involvement in the school and classroom setting during the week of preplanning and the first week of school. Students study the school context; learn effective procedures necessary for establishing, managing, and organizing a classroom; and participate in opening school experiences.

398 Honors Research (3-6)

(PR: Acceptance into Teacher Education Program)

400 Observation/Assessment; 401 Planning; and 402 Teaching: Directed Teaching in Secondary School Education (3, 3, 6)

(PR: Acceptance into Teacher Education Program; SR status and successful completion of all requirements for clinical practice) A program of supervised observation and teaching in cooperation with selected secondary schools in which opportunities are provided for the student to practice the skills of teaching. A minimum grade of “C” is required to receive the College’s recommendation for certification.

442 Directed Studies (1-6)

(PR: JR or SR status; departmental majors and students in teacher certification programs only; minimum GPA 2.75) Designed to allow the student to pursue a topic of special interest.

444 Internship (1-6)

(PR: minimum GPA 2.75)

446 Readings (1-6)

448 Research (1-6)

(PR: Departmental majors and students in teacher certification programs; minimum GPA 2.75)

450 Seminar (3)

452 Special Projects (1-6)

458 Special Topics (1-6)